The measles is something that many people think they don’t have to fear anymore, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. In 2019 so far, we’ve seen more cases of the measles than we’ve seen since the disease was considered to be eliminated in 2000. We decided to dig a little deeper to find out where the measles have been seen the most, as well as what’s caused the sudden return.

What States have the Measles?

So far, 26 states have reported cases of measles in 2019. These states include:

  • Arizona
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Illinois
  • Indiana
  • Iowa
  • Kentucky
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Missouri
  • New Mexico
  • Nevada
  • New Hampshire
  • New jersey
  • New York
  • Oklahoma
  • Oregon
  • Pennsylvania
  • Texas
  • Tennessee
  • Washington

Luckily, many of those states have only seen one or two cases in 2019. States that have seen 3 or more cases are considered to be having a measles outbreak. New York, Michigan, California, Georgia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Washington are all considered to have an outbreak. New York and California sit at the top of the list for the number of cases and different jurisdictions affected with an outbreak.

What Causes a Measles Outbreak?

New York has seen a higher number of measles cases than any other state this year. The measles cases in New York can be primarily linked to a Orthodox religious group who does not receive vaccinations against the measles. Some members of the community went on a trip to Israel, where they were exposed to the disease. After returning home, many of their friends and family were exposed and the outbreak began. Pockets of unvaccinated individuals is the leading cause of a measles outbreak, especially after some of those individuals travel abroad.

Preventing the Measles

Rather you plan to travel abroad or not, the best way to prevent catching the measles is by ensuring you have all of your necessary vaccinations. Travel to any of the states facing a measles outbreak should be done with caution, especially for those groups of people who can’t be vaccinated. Young children and pregnant women are at an especially high risk for catching the measles.

Of course, sometimes travel to a state with an outbreak is unavoidable. Just having the knowledge that the state is facing a measles outbreak gives you the ability to protect yourself and prepare before you go.